IvanFetch.com - Icom IC-T90 Instructions

Introduction:

The aim of this page is to provide useful information for operators of the IC-T90 6 Meter/2 Meter/70 CM tri-band handheld ham radio who are visually impaired. Hopefully this page will assist those who would like to get a good idea of what the radio looks like and how it operates (whether they already own the radio or are looking into purchasing it). Additionally, you can listen to a demo I originally recorded for ACB Radio - here is the mp3 (about 20 Mb in size).

The manual for the t90 is pretty accessible when converted from pdf - click on the URL below to access the PDF manual, or paste the URL into the body of an email message sent to pdf2txt@adobe.com if you'd like a text version of the PDF file emailed back to you.
http://www.icomamerica.com/support/documents/manuals/ict90.pdf

Helpful Operating Info:

Here is some general information about the Icom IC-t90 which is good to know for optimal use by the visually impaired:

Menu Navigation with the Tuning Dial

When using the dial to choose a configuration option from the menu, or to set a value for a configuration option, the selection does not wrap once you've reached the lowest or highest value. For example, if you are picking a value 1 through 5 with the dial, and the dial currently resides on 5, turning the dial to the right will not start over at 1 again; the value will remain at 5.

Multifunction Buttons and Audible Feedback

The buttons on the t90's key pad perform multiple functions - just pressing a button, holding the button down for 1 second, or holding the button down for 2 seconds all do different things. Exceptions to this are the power and volume buttons. Pressing a button causes the radio to emit a short beep, holding a button down for one second results in a slightly longer beep, and holding a button down for 2 seconds typically results in two short beeps.

When entering a frequency or memory location by number using the key pad, the last digit entered will always produce a slightly longer beep. For example, entering a frequency consists of 3 digits, followed by a decimal point, and three more digits. Entering 145.340 will produce a slightly longer beep when you press the 0 button. Entering memory locations will produce a beep on the 3rd digit, as memory locations are only 3 digits long.

Layout of the T90:

Here is a description of the t90 (sides and top of the radio first):

Here is the layout and labels of the buttons on the front panel of the radio:

Transfering a Memory Locations's Contents to VFO:

Sometimes it is nice to transfer a memory location's contents (frequency, subaudible tones) to VFO mode, such as when you want to tune around near the frequency in the memory location. Transfering the contents of a memory location to VFO is assentially the opposite of programming a memory location.